Friday, June 12, 2009

Illustrator tip: Resizing your artboard in CS4

This tip is only for CS4 users. (IMHO it's worth getting if you don't have it yet )
Say you've made an illustration on an A4 sized artboard, but your illustration is a lot smaller and you want to get rid of the excess white paper. That can easily be solved.
In the example below the black stroke is the A4 paper.
1. Draw a rectangle on top of the illustration. This will be your new page size. Make sure the rectangle is selected.2. Select the Artboard Tool (shift o) to select the A4 artboard.3. Double click on the rectangle. The rectangle now becomes the new page size.4. Select the rectangle with the direct selection tool and delete it. You now have an artboard (page) the same size as the rectangle.
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6 comments:

Janene Steenkamp said...

Thanks. I only just started working in Illustrator, and this was most useful.

J

Jbcarey said...

yesy, thanks for leaving this tip... very handy when you don't know what you're doing :D

Anonymous said...

What am I missing? Given that having to resize a graphic to print appropriately on standard paper sizes, why isn't there a straightforward and easy method of resizing the artboard, such as a menu drop down with 8 1/2 x 11, legal, ledger, etc.? With the product in development since 1988, is this an intentional GUI omission to keep the product out of the hands of casual users and appeal to the graphic geek/professional designer (to maintain the high product cost, maybe)? I can't think of another reason why, so that's why I'm posting this -- not to vent, but to really get at the mystery of some of the peculiar challenges in using Adobe products that not only persist but seem to intensify with each new version. Any thoughts?

Anonymous said...

... and after that speech, I found there is indeed already a drop down ... found it by selecting the Artboard Tool ... right where it's supposed to be. I'm going away now ... for good.

Linda said...

You beat me to it. And you are welcome anytime.

Lewis N. Clark said...

Say you've made an illustration on an A4 sized artboard, but your illustration is a lot smaller and you want to get rid of the excess white paper. That can easily be solved. logo design